archives

Christ

This tag is associated with 3 posts

God, Death, Existence and Time

Spirit Soul Has No DeathMy existence is predicated upon consciousness, referred to in metaphysical circles as “the soul” — a massless, formless living force, a “spirit.” I am not a product of my physical manifestation. I am not a machine, defined by neurons and synapses and the complexities of the human brain. We can map out our brains and determine which parts are involved with which functions, but our brain does not define us, it merely facilitates us by translating our CODEC. Our body is a machine, our brain a complex CPU. And I am the software, the “ghost in the machine.”

The point at which mass becomes less than the smallest particle, the quark, matter loses locality (becoming undefined by physical laws as we currently understand them). Undetectable, immeasurable, timeless, and as far as we can understand, non-existent. Such is the nature of the “spirit.”

God as spirit, in this understanding, is “non-existent” and His domain, “non-existence.” The paradox of a non-existent being existing in a non-existent plane of existence is, in fact, how the Bible describes God. He does not exist in any concept we have of “existence.” And the only time He ever “existed,” he plugged himself into the body of what we know as Jesus Christ, though since he was human, was no longer God. And yet he was. He was limited and fallible like us, and yet he wasn’t. So the only way we can see him as God, is when he is not appearing to us as God, since God is formless and immeasurable.

If God has always existed, what was He doing before He created the universe? Since time did not (and still doesn’t) exist, God did not have time to do anything “before” time. This is rather difficult to grasp.

The Theory of Relativity does not apply to a world in which time is non-existent. When we consider the psychological aspects of time, we are again dealing with the relativity, but relativity as experienced, rather than as measured. We are still dealing with time, but not with eternity. There is neither measured nor experienced relativity of time in a purely spiritual world, because time belongs to the physical order.

It can be argued that in experience, the passage of time could be so rapid as to be virtually eclipsed. It would appear that you could experience timelessness within the natural order. This is confusing because it implies that if a thing is small enough, it is nothing at all. This is analogous to saying that there is no fundamental between something and nothing; or, to use a more familiar idea at the other end of the scale, that infinity is merely a very, very large number. However, infinity differs from a very large number for the important reason that if you subtract one from a very large number (no matter how large it is), you have one less: if you subtract one from infinity, you still have infinity.

Time stands in the same relation to eternity, in one sense, as a large number does to infinity. There is a sense in which infinity includes a very large number, yet it is quite fundamentally different and independent of it. And by analogy, eternity includes time and yet is fundamentally something other. The reduction of time until it gets smaller and smaller is still not eternity; nor do we reach eternity by an extension of time to great length. There is no direct pathway between time and eternity: they are different categories of experiences.

The fundamental point is when we step out of time, we step into eternity, and while we cannot be in them both at once, God, according to the Bible, is able to so. Some passages come to mind immediately in support of the view that God lives outside the ordinary limitations of time as we experience it. For example, “Before Abraham was, I am” (John 8:58). If we make the period before Abraham to be represented by the letter A, Abraham’s time by the letter B, and the time of speaking by the letter C, we have the three periods A, B, C amalgamated as one and the tenses confused as though C preceded A. What we might have expected to find was, “Before Abraham was, I was” — which would have satisfied our normal sense of time.

eternityChrist took Abraham’s time as the pivot and spoke of two periods balanced on either side, namely, the ages which preceded Abraham, and all that followed (including the present). He then deliberately picked up the present and put it back before Abraham, but still referred to that distant period in the present tense. Though it was centuries ago, to Christ it was “now.” Even if He was here today, He would still refer to the time before Abraham as the “present” time. Why? Because He is God, and to God there is no passage of time, but all is “present.” The reaction of the Jewish authorities to His statement suggests that in some strange way they had understood what He meant. The mystery of God’s name, as revealed to Moses in Exodus 3:13,14 “the One who is existing always in the present” is unlocked here.

When a Christian dies, from this understanding, they pass from this realm of time and space into another realm of pure spirit, out of time as we experience it into a state of timelessness, the ever-present of God‘s domain. As they make this passage, every event in the future passes instantly before them, completed instantaneously. As each of us passes, we therefore experience no death nor the slightest pause in consciousness, nor even any sense of departure from those who remain.

The experience would be the same for everyone. All history, all intervening time between death and the end of time, is suddenly annihilated so that each person from the very first to the very last, is just dying and arriving in a single instant together, without precedence and without the slightest consciousness of delay. Scripture twice affirms, observing events from our point of view, that no man has yet ascended into heaven (John 3:13), not even David (Acts 2:34). And yet, when we are absent from the body, we are present with the Lord in eternity. David is not there yet, nor any others, because we are not there.

Ultimately, we will dwell in a “new heaven and a new earth,” so perhaps time will always be with us thenceforth. But we shall experience time not as limitation, but as opportunity. Time will not be continually running out as it is now; unlimited time for unlimited adventure.

This is, of course, purely hypothetical, and just a thought. Thanks for reading.

Lessons of 9/11

9-11-flagLive each day as though it were your last.

Put an end to petty jealousies. Forgive all those who have wronged you. The freedom from letting go is overwhelming in intensity.

Share the gratitude of your heart with all those around you. Radiance is infectious.

Live selflessly. The needs of others should supersede your own. If others follow your example, someone will take care of you in the same regard you take care of everyone else.

Connect with supreme Consciousness (God, Holy Spirit) and let enlightenment guide your every thought. In such a way, every second will count, every moment matter.

We cannot live for ourselves. Our lives here are temporary and extremely brief. We all knew this on 9/11. The whole was eminently greater than each part. We lived as one. We grieved as one. We can do this every single day.

And we should.

The Cosmic Force

The inspired mind is locked into the Stream. Just put your fingers on the keyboard and type without knowledge of what is coming; hands and fingers moving faster than ever and still not keeping up with flow. Understandings beyond anything pondered or imagined. Just write and write and write and don’t stop until you collapse from exhaustion. Write without notes or idea outlines. Just write and write while your eyes are looking else where. This is not normal. This is savant territory. Such is the power and inspiration of the Holy Spirit.

We are not machines. Machine men. Living a life of fleeting highs and crushing lows and darkness without end. We are more than a paycheck. Our time here is but the briefest of moments. We must make each moment count, treating others with respect, as your brother or sister or mother or father. Love them through God’s Spirit, for He is love. Show no prejudice. Hold back no kind words. Help and assist and offer helpful advice without expectation of return. Live selflessly. Every moment of every day, without exception. The Spirit is eternal and never sleeps.

The Spirit is not a thing. He is an entity which encompasses the entire fabric and force of all things throughout time and space. Filled with this Spirit, we are connected to every single atom, quark, quanta. Every thought, every image, natural force, cosmic body, every moment of the universe, flows within the Spirit’s vibration. He occupies the entire time-space continuum. Every galaxy, super nova, shooting star. Every breeze, cloud, hurricane, tidal wave, volcano. This is what it says in Scripture. The Eastern mystics all examine and investigate and write down their assessment of The Holy Spirit through concepts of Qi, Karma, the Cosmic Stream, Cosmic Strings, Infinite Wisdom, The Force. One can easily bridge the gap and pull these together and see how they intertwine.

Archives

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Top Posts & Pages